Owl Editing

Owl Editing

Tips for writers

Posts filed under writing

Reducing bias in writing-5

Age should be reported as part of the description of participants in the Method section. Be specific in providing age ranges; avoid open-ended definitions such as “under 18 years” or “over 65 years.” Girl and boy are correct terms for referring to individuals under the age of 12 years. Young man and young woman and… (read more)

Reducing bias in writing-4

Write about the people in your study in a way that acknowledges their participation but is also consistent with the traditions of the field in which you are working. Thus, although descriptive terms such as college students, children, or respondents provide precise information about the individuals taking part in a research project, the more general… (read more)

Reducing bias in writing-3

From the APA Publication Manual (6th ed) (2010): Bias may be promoted when the writer uses one group (often the writer’s own group) as the standard against which others are judged, for example, citizens of the United States. In some contexts, the term culturally deprived may imply that one culture is the universally accepted standard…. (read more)

Reducing bias in writing-1

From the APA Publication Manual (6th ed) (2010): Respect people’s preferences; call people what they prefer to be called. Accept that preferences change with time and that individuals within groups often disagree about the designations they prefer. Make an effort to determine what is appropriate for your situation; you may need to ask your participants… (read more)

Proper use of articles

The root word of “the” is “this” or “that” (definite article). The root word of “a/an” is “any” (indefinite article). This table shows how the articles should be used with nouns:   SINGULAR NOUN PLURAL NOUN DEFINITE ARTICLE the the INDEFINITE ARTICLE a/an –

A common error in writing: nominalization

Nominalization is changing a verb into a noun. When you change a verb to a noun, you take the strength away from the sentence. For example, “to conclude” is a specific act but if you are “reaching a conclusion” you’ve eliminated the specific action and replaced it with an all-purpose verb. Instead of “concluding,” the… (read more)